It is currently Mon Jun 01, 2020 10:15 pm

All times are UTC






Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 128 posts ] 


Author Message
 Post subject: Phasing out of lamps...
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:55 am 
Offline
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 06, 2009 12:48 am
Posts: 6227
Images: 1729
http://www.osram.com/osram_com/Consumer ... index.html

According to this, there are going to be a few types of lamps phased out over the next few years.

2010
   * Phase out of T8 halophosphate fluorescent lamps (1)
2012
   * Phase out of T12 fluorescent lamps (1)
   * Phase out of High-pressure sodium lamps (HPS): HPS standard quality (only E27/ E40/ PGZ12 affected)
   * Phase out of Metal halide lamp lamps (MH): Less efficient MH lamps (only E27/E40/PGZ12 affected)
2014
   * Review of the regulations by the EU Commission
2015
   * Phase out of High-pressure mercury lamps (HPM)
   * Phase out of Plug-in/retrofit high-pressure sodium lamps (2) (= direct replacement for HPM)
2017
   * Phase out of Poor performing metal halide lamps (MH) (only E27/E40/PGZ12 affected)

(1) through minimum efficiency requirements
(2) Plug-in lamps must correspond to Super/Plus HPS level; almost all plug-in/retrofit lamps will be banned Information correct as of December 2008; data may differ from the final EU directive.


I don't know what Halophosphate T8 tubes are compared to ordinary flu tubes, but they're the first to go, followed by T12 flu's in 2012. Looks like we'll have to stock up on T12's - I may get a few 5-footers for my Festival; I already have a couple of 2-footers I need to test.

2012 will see Standard HPS phased out... Now, as excited as this made me at first, a second thought makes me think this will not be a blanket ban on SON (sadly). Rather, the standard types will be phased out, so things like PIA-Plus and Phillips Master (and the one that goes a bit whiter than normal) and possibly White SON may remain... Though I don't know what the PGZ12 lamp base is.

2015 is the date to be aware of, as Mercury gets banned then. so we effectively have 5 years to stockpile, before they go the way of the SLI. Also, the SON retrofit for Mercury is also to go in the same year, so there'll be no choice for mercury lanterns but to convert them.

"Poor Performing" MH lamps will go in 2017. I don't know whether "poor performing" includes standard CDM-T lamps, or just the old Quartz MH lamps. If the newer CDM lamps are included, then it'll only leave things like Cosmo lamps.


By 2012 all Filament and Halogen lamps above 7 watts will also be Banned except for Special application Lamps, by 2017 High Performance Fluorescent and Discharge Lamps will be used for Commercial Industrial and Street Lighting, and for General Lighting Compact Fluorescent and LED lamps will be used.

_________________
Tesco brings all the mums to the yard...
and they're like "do you have your club card"
Image


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 7:38 am 
Offline
Member
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 8:54 pm
Posts: 2977
Images: 210
Right I'll get my lamp stock bin ready for the mercury lamps, hopefully I can overload it so I have then a good 50 years worth of mercury lamps. What's happening with SOX lamps? are these going an' all.

Remember everyone. Once we've all stocked up on lamps whatever you do - try not to break them or otherwise you'll be knackered after 2015.

Additional Information: we should also stock up on ballasts for the mercury incase any decide to fail.

_________________
From streetlighting to radio, dance through the night whilst the streetlights are glowing outside.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 3:19 pm 
Offline
Member
Random avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:20 am
Posts: 1046
Location: Cleveleys nr Blackpool
I wouldn't panic too much. The fact you can still buy an SLI lamp in 2009 (albeit few and far between), 23 years after they ceased production makes me think that a lot of wholesalers will still have mercury lamps, less-efficient SON lamps etc for a long time to come. If not, there will be a heck of a lot of streetlighting needing converting/replacing at once!

Urbis Saturn Land wrote:
What's happening with SOX lamps? are these going an' all.


It doesn't mention them and I doubt they will be banned. Most of the light sources being banned are inefficient types and as we all well know, SOX is still one of the most efficient light-sources around, especially SOX-E lamps.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 4:39 pm 
Offline
Site Administration
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:38 pm
Posts: 3237
Images: 27
Location: Salisbury
SOX and SOX-E are still some of the most efficient lamps in terms of Lm/W. I suspect the less efficient MH to be phased out will be the quartz type. Cosmo/CDM-T/CDO-T are the most efficient and still relatively new so I can't see them going. Not quite sure why T8 Halophosphate are going though - that particular fluorescent coating must be of poor efficiency.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 5:22 pm 
Offline
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:27 pm
Posts: 1696
Images: 200
Gramma6 wrote:
I wouldn't panic too much. The fact you can still buy an SLI lamp in 2009 (albeit few and far between), 23 years after they ceased production makes me think that a lot of wholesalers will still have mercury lamps, less-efficient SON lamps etc for a long time to come. If not, there will be a heck of a lot of streetlighting needing converting/replacing at once!


The difference is, mercury lighting has always been significantly more popular than SLI. SLI did not die out because of a lamp ban on efficiency grounds, SLI died out because since the mid-1960s SOX was becoming more efficient and was a cheaper lamp to manufacture and sell. Meanwhile, mercury is still popular. It may be relatively inefficient, but it produces white light, plus the lamps and gear are cheap to manufacture and sell.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:15 pm 
Offline
Member
Random avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:20 am
Posts: 1046
Location: Cleveleys nr Blackpool
Is there a more efficient form of 'long' fluorescent tube? Our kitchen and garage are lit with T12 fluorescents and if these tubes are phased out it will mean having to install new light fittings if we can't buy replacements for them.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:44 pm 
Offline
Site Administration
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:38 pm
Posts: 3237
Images: 27
Location: Salisbury
T8 tubes have been around for about 30 years now and are more efficient than T12s - apart it seems the T8 Halophosphate. Some facts and figures for T8 tubes:

Halophosphate:

Philips 36w, 3350Lm. Osram 58w, 5200Lm

Triphosphate:

36w, 2850Lm, 58w 4600Lm

So Triphosphate produce more Lm/W but appear to be more expensive.

Quote:
Triphosphor tubes have a longer life, a lower mercury content, better colour rendering and higher lumen maintenance than their halophosphate counterparts.


T8 can be used in T12 fittings.

Commercial and industrial use have now moved towards the smaller diameter T5 tubes. These have very similar lumen levels to T8 but are designed to use high frequency electronic gear. Therefore there is an overall power saving for the luminare compared to fittings using magnetic gear.

Quote:
16mm (T5) tubes provide a more compact alternative to T8 tubes, offering peak performance at 35 degrees C and typically provide 5% more efficiency in most ceiling applications compared to equivalent T8 tubes.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 9:21 pm 
Offline
Member
Random avatar

Joined: Fri Nov 13, 2009 4:49 pm
Posts: 811
Images: 108
Our kitchen light has a T12 lamp, but it used to have a T8 lamp. Mum was worried that the lamp was too big to fit in but it did anyway, just looks out of proportion with the fitting! My granny has a Thorn T12 lamp in a much 'bustier'  ;) fitting, and I imagine a T8 would look lost in it!

_________________
"I used to rule the world... Now I sweep the streets I used to own."
Remembering GEC.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 9:23 pm 
Offline
Site Administration
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 09, 2009 5:38 pm
Posts: 3237
Images: 27
Location: Salisbury
T8 and T12 share the same pin pitch despite the different diameter. T5 use a diffferent pin pitch.


Top
 Profile  Personal album 
 
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2009 11:54 pm 
Offline
Member
Random avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 25, 2009 12:20 am
Posts: 1046
Location: Cleveleys nr Blackpool
So therefore the answer to my question is buy a T8 tube next time but make sure it's triphosphate, not halophosphate!  :)


Top
 Profile  
 

Display posts from previous:  Sort by  


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 128 posts ] 

All times are UTC



You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests



Search for:

cron