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PostPosted: Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:13 pm 
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As time goes on, LED street lighting is standardising in design towards the "flat panel and LED driver bulge" design. Of all the methods of using LEDs, arranging LEDs in flat panels pointing downwards with an array of butterfly lenses is becoming the norm.

I bring this up, because Phosco has launched the P862, which does away with having LEDs angled to spread light along the road. Phosco already use flat-panels of LED chips with butterfly lenses on a number of their other products. Similarly, Urbis have moved away from angled LEDs in favour of flat panels. Even the Stela is something of an oddity which has seen popularity but is a design that has not been replicated.

It's a shame, as it seems modern LED lanterns are moving towards following the same design cues.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2015 11:01 pm 
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You're absolutely right here.

I suppose flair or aesthetics is the first thing to get dumped in a sector motivated by reducing costs.

Everywhere you go you see unpainted columns and ugly brackets. Visual appeal has long since been a considerable factor.

I suppose the flat panel philosophy has its advantages, smaller overall size, lower visual impact, lower wind profile...

But it is a shame considering the LED form factor gives so much scope for interesting designs.

I have learnt to accept LED is the future, it has rendered all other forms of streetlighting obsolete in just a couple of years.

However for me the light distribution needs work. Its very glary and the cutoff is sharp creating uneven bright spots and shadows.

I live in area that's gone from Celests to Vmaxs. Whilst I'm sure its saving power its unpleasant to drive through.

I'd like to see manufacturers look at semi cutoff designs with diffuse bowls/ glass that reduce the point of glare.

However I'm pretty sure that won't happen.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2015 11:36 am 
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Hi

I have noticed that some of the Holophane Factor LED lanterns being installed have coloured squares stuck to the bottom of the gear doors. The smaller lanterns have IIRC yellow and red squares and the larger lamps green and blue squares.

Can anyone tell me if these have any significance?


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 11, 2015 1:30 pm 
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To identify the number of LEDs/wattage of the lanterns?


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 12, 2015 8:31 am 
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I suppose one thing we can be sure of is that we will never see a period again - as we have in the last 50 years, where lanterns and columns have had service lives of 40+ years.

I wouldn't be surprised if LED lanterns get replaced every couple of years by the next super efficient model, in much the same way we change our mobile phones.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 11:12 pm 
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SilverRay88 wrote:
...we will never see a period again - as we have in the last 50 years, where lanterns and columns have had service lives of 40+ years.


An interesting point being offered by SilverRay.

In some respects, the longevity of the UK streetlighting infrastructure, is identical to other areas of "public" assets, which were also introduced to great aplomb in the postwar years as part of a huge period of modernisation. Comparable examples would be British Railways, the GPO, National Grid etc. All the obsolete plant associated with these sectors would have been replaced long ago, but due mainly to the lack of political will and funding, such equipment was destined to last a good while longer.

Other points to note however are that public equipment at the time was sold on its merits of not just being modern, but being economical, long lasting and cheap to maintain. This is why concrete was seen as the obvious choice for public lighting columns and why they lasted for so long. The same argument is seemingly offered when looking to install LEDs, however as SilverRay points out such equipment installed today won't have anywhere near as long a service life.

Finally, it must be remembered that we live in a modern world, where long lasting appliances are bad for the economy. It makes no sense to install equipment that will last for 50 years without a hitch, because the economy and nation needs to be fed. This difficulty however has been traditionally alleviated by employing two fundamental laws - obsolescence and fashion.

As has been pointed out already, a mobile phone is soon declared obsolete technically due to the continual improvement in technology. However, it can become out-of-date even if still working, simply because it is old fashioned or ugly when compared to its successor. This is why the market aims new products at the young, because they follow fashion (or peer pressure) and generally have the disposable income to fund it.

In terms of streetlighting where fashion and obsolescence is already playing a part, the new LED lanterns now gracing our highways, will themselves be scrap in a short space of time indeed - well, for as long as the new money continues to roll in!

_________________
"As we moved along in a little procession, I was delighted with the illumination of the streets. So many lamps and they burned until morning, my father said, and so people did not need to carry lanterns."
Mary Antin - US author & activist. 1881-1949.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 12, 2017 9:37 am 
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I am not sure if anyone here follows big clive on youtube.

His posts are hugely informative and engaging.

Here he is taking apart a no-brand LED streetlight

https://youtu.be/zqg-uOvIUCg


There are more on his channel.


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