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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 4:53 pm 
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Earlier this year, I had the pleasure of visiting Ireland on two occasions – to celebrate a friend’s 40th birthday with a weekend in Dublin, and as a guest at a work colleague’s wedding in a magical village called Knockatallon in County Monaghan. My work colleague and her husband had their wedding reception in Cavan, which is also in Ireland, but the road journey between the two venues crossed the Ireland / Northern Ireland border four or six times, depending on which roads you travelled on. As the United Kingdom is still in the European Union, wedding guests could cross all four or six borders without even reducing their speed.

When arranging return flights from my work colleague’s wedding, it soon became apparent that the cost of a return flight to the UK mainland on a Sunday was just as expensive as staying overnight in Dublin on Sunday night and returning on a quieter flight on Monday. The opportunity to stay another day in Dublin for no extra money was duly seized, and I present some photographs of Dublin’s lighting, taken on both trips, below.

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Dublin at dusk, as viewed from the Gravity Bar. The Gravity Bar is on top of the Guinness Storehouse and concludes the Guinness Brewery tour. This photograph was taken in January 2017.

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Dublin city centre is dominated by high pressure sodium lighting, for example these top-entry GEC Z8527s on cast iron columns on Custom House Quay alongside the River Liffey. This photograph was taken in April 2017.

As Ireland is our closest neighbour, many UK street lighting enthusiasts will find many aspects of Ireland’s street lighting very familiar.

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There is also plenty of SOX lighting on the smaller roads around the city centre and especially in the suburbs, e.g. this Thorn Alpha Four just south of the river. This photograph was also taken in April 2017.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:00 pm 
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My second post looks at Dublin’s many cast iron columns. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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The city centre is dominated by authentic cast iron columns and modern reproduction columns that attempt to blend in with them. According to this discussion about Dublin’s street lighting, the originals date from circa 1900 to 1930, or possibly even earlier. I believe these lanterns above, on Custom House Quay (also photographed at night earlier in this post), may be the original columns.

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From my walk around Dublin on a glorious sunny day in April 2017, I spotted four different styles of scrollwork. These magnificent ornate scrollwork brackets were the most intricately detailed found. According to this web site, this bracket is known as the Scotch Standard and dates from 1903 to 1920.

They are replacement brackets for the original swan-necks that were used in the days of the carbon arc lamps. One of the original swan-neck brackets survives and is housed in Dublin’s Merrion Square Park, which doubles as a museum of old Dublin street lights.

The shamrock features prominently in Dublin’s historic street lighting.

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Some streets, e.g. Fitzwilliam Place, have what seems to be an endless installation of these cast iron columns.

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A zoomed-in view of Fitzwilliam Place looking north-east up towards Merrion Square East.

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The city centre also has plenty of double-headed ornate scrollwork brackets.

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The Baggot Street Lower dual carriageway is pictured above.

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How the cast iron brackets look at night. This column has one of the top-entry GEC Z8527s.

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This alternative version of the exquisitely detailed scrollwork bracket features only one shamrock. According to this web site, this bracket is the Rathmines Urban District Council Standard and dates from 1900 to 1920.

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A slightly less exquisitely detailed scrollwork bracket. These brackets are on Herbert Place, which runs alongside the Grand Canal.

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A photograph of Herbert Place, suggesting that the columns which feature these brackets are original casties.

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This scrollwork bracket on what looks to be one of the original cast iron columns on Merrion Square East wins an award for being a shameless modern reproduction!


Last edited by David on Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:05 pm 
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My third post looks at two double-headed Sofrapel concrete columns with their large copper and brass Holophane “Dublin” lanterns. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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From lights that are less than a few years old to lights that, if they last into next year, will be celebrating their 80th birthday. These original concrete columns and original lanterns were still standing in College Street as of April 2017. This one is on the north side of College Street.

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Looking east along College Street near its junction with D’Olier Street and Pearse Street. Two of these old concrete columns – one on each side of the road – still soldier on (as of April 2017). They are assumed to be 79 years old.

Simon Cornwell has a fantastic write-up on the Archiseek forum, where he notes that the lighting on nearby O’Connell Street, a very wide thoroughfare, was inadequate and work started on replacing the previous lanterns in 1938. These fabulously strong concrete columns and art deco twin brackets, manufactured by Sofrapel of Paris, were installed in O’Connell Street with large copper and brass Holophane “Dublin” lanterns. In their time, they were considered to be the best lighting installation in Ireland.

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The column on the south side of College Street. Note the ongoing roadworks around the installation. These are for the construction of the Luas Cross City tram line which is scheduled for completion in December. This may finally end their long run.

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A close-up of the bracket and lanterns on the column outside Trinity College.

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A second view of the same column on the south side of College Street.

Simon also notes on the Archiseek forum that, back in 1938, the Holophane Dublin lanterns started out with 1,500W tungsten lamps, and were modernised with 700W mercury lanterns in 1963, before being removed altogether in 1972. We must be thankful that, 45 years later, some of them still survive as of April 2017. Noting their advanced years and changing light sources, a trip back to College Street in the evening was in order, to see what lamps they were running now.

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The same view looking east along College Street, as photographed earlier in the day. All four of these near-80 year old lanterns were in light, and were running high pressure sodium lamps.

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Despite their advancing years, they were doing a fabulous job of lighting College Street.

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A close-up of the Sofrapel column and double bracket with the Holophane Dublin lanterns outside Doyle’s Bar.

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A night-time photograph of Doyle’s bar, Dublin. But this scenic view may be on borrowed time. The replacement street light is unlikely to be anywhere near as pretty.

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One last night-time photograph of this magnificent installation, of the column outside Doyle’s Bar on the north side of College Street.

Noting that the roadworks in College Street for the construction of the Luas Cross City tram line is scheduled for completion in December, it would be fabulous if some effort was made into moving one of these two magnificent columns and lanterns into Dublin’s Merrion Square Park, which doubles as a museum of old Dublin street lights.

More pictures of the Sofrapel columns and their Holophane Dublin lanterns can be found here.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:07 pm 
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My fourth post looks at other street lighting to be found in Dublin’s city centre. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017 unless otherwise stated.

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The Baggot Street Bridge takes Baggot Street Lower over the Grand Canal, and features this amazing Stanton 6B column and bracket, which may date as far back as the 1940s. Simon Cornwell’s page.

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A close-up of the surviving Stanton 6B bracket with the now familiar top-entry GEC Z8527.

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New LED spanwire lighting in Moore Street in Dublin city centre. This photograph was taken in January 2017.

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Standing outside The Bank of Ireland building in George’s Dock is this unusual lamp post...

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...which inexplicably has arms and hands.

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All nearby street lighting is ‘armless!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:10 pm 
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My fifth post looks at other lighting in Dublin city centre, which in some cases additionally performs the function of street lighting. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017 unless otherwise stated.

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O’Connell Bridge has these magnificent three-headed traditional post-top lanterns to each parapet.

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The lighting in the central reservation has these even more magnificent five-headed posts.

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The gorgeous Ha’penny Bridge over the River Liffey celebrated its 200th birthday in 2016.

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The Ha’penny Bridge’s lighting by night.

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The many bridges over the River Liffey have a fabulous range of traditional and modern street lighting that is both decorative and functional. These supersized candles in the style of the Thorn Alumet are on Rosie Hackett Bridge.

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The supersized candles illuminating the Rosie Hackett Bridge, as viewed from the River Liffey.

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On the subject of supersized candles, this amazing art installation of red-painted Thorn Alumet-style columns can be found outside the Bord Gáis Energy Theatre on, erm, Misery Hill.

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Street lighting enthusiasts visiting Dublin may be lucky enough to find Five Lamps Dublin Lager on draught in some bars. It would be rude not to give it a try! This photograph was taken in January 2017.

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The Five Lamps, after which the Dublin Brewery was named, is a lamp post at the junction of five roads to the north east of the city centre, and dates back to circa. 1880.

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A close-up photograph of the exquisitely-decorated five-lamped head of the lamp post.


Last edited by David on Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:13 pm 
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My sixth post looks at private lighting in Dublin city centre, generally speaking to the outside of shops, bars and restaurants. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017 unless otherwise stated.

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Two exquisite and very large green lanterns on the side of the Post Office in O’Connell Street, encountered by chance when I went to buy stamps for some postcards.

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The Boxty House restaurant in Dublin’s Temple Bar has a brown-painted Revo Prefect to each end of its shop front. This photograph was taken in January 2017.

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Between the two Prefects we have a brown-painted GEC Z5590. This photograph was taken in April 2017.

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The Palace Bar in Fleet Street has this copper-topped lamppost outside.

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A close-up photograph of the Palace Bar’s lantern.

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These brass plaques at the base of the lamppost outside are a tribute to the Palace Bar’s most famous literary patrons.

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The Palace Bar lit up at night.

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TGI Friday’s, next door to the Palace Bar, has this unidentified street lantern on a superb wall-mounted bracket.

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Dicey’s Garden restaurant, bar and nightclub in Harcourt Street (a few doors down from Copper Face Jacks nightclub) has a novel way of ensuring its clientele can easily find the venue at night, even if under the influence of drink. Eleven roof-mounted Thorn Beta Twos burning 55W SOX lamps act as a glowing waymarker late into the evening.

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Exquisite post-top lanterns with purple glass on a building on the south side of St. Stephen’s Green.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:17 pm 
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My seventh post looks at main road street lighting outside the city centre, and more precisely, the places close to the city centre that I was able to walk to on foot in a day – namely Ranelagh, Rathmines, Rathgar and Harold’s Cross. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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The R114 Rathgar Road between Rathfgar and Rathmines is a long straight SOX-lit road with occasional SON casual replacements. Among the many 135W SOX lanterns was this Phosco P160.

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A close-up of the Phosco P160.

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Further south along the Rathgar Road was a second example in even better condition.

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A close-up of the second Phosco P160.

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In nearby Rathgar Avenue, an Alpha Nine for 90W SOX is spotted mounted at 10 metres.

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A close-up of the Alpha Nine. The unusual bowl and spigot end suggests it is an early example.

Had I have walked a little further south west towards Terenure and Kimmage, I would have encountered some ornate pole-mounted scrollwork brackets here and here.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:20 pm 
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My eighth post looks at a magnificent installation of Stanton 6Bs with GEC Z9455s and Phosco P156s to be found in Kenilworth Park and North Kenilworth Road in Harold’s Cross. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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The junction of Rathgar Avenue (where the Alpha Nine was found), Kenilworth Park, North Kenilworth Road and Harold’s Cross Road. GEC Z9554s, Z9455s, Phosco P156s and Thorn Alpha Fours can be seen here.

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This pair of Stanton 6B columns and brackets in an opposed arrangement stands at the entrance of North Kenilworth Road, with the lighting reverting to a staggered arrangement beyond. GEC Z9455s are used here, with a Phosco P156 further up the road.

Baggot Street Bridge, in my fourth post, also has a Stanton 6B column and bracket.

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Sadly some of the 6B brackets have succumbed to far less inspiring casual replacements. This one of many similar examples on North Kenilworth Road suggests that many of the bracket losses have been quite recent.

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One of the Stanton 6B column bases.

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Kenilworth Park as viewed from Harold’s Cross Road has these Stanton 6Bs with Phosco P156s. Were there more to be found around the corner?

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An unbroken line of six Stanton 6Bs on Kenilworth Park, as viewed from the junction with Clareville Road.

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An occasional GEC Z9455 can be found among the  Phosco P156s

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Many of the Stanton 6B columns and brackets and Phosco P156s were in good condition.

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The view along the straight section of Kenilworth Park has even more Stanton 6B columns and brackets further in the distance.

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This Stanton 6B looks to have had a modified bracket fitted, perhaps dating from the 1950s (Simon Cornwell's page) as the bracket fin behind the column is filled instead of open.

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Sadly the last in the line of six unbroken Stanton 6Bs on Kenilworth Park has this rather worrying repair.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:25 pm 
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My ninth post looks at side road street lighting outside the city centre, and more precisely, the places close to the city centre that I was able to walk to on foot in a day – namely Ranelagh, Rathmines, Rathgar and Harold’s Cross. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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In Cumberland Road a little nearer the city centre, this Stanton 7B column, was found.

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The bracket holds a green-painted GEC Z9539 with a 55W SOX lamp.

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This column and bracket may also date back to the 1940s. Simon Cornwell’s site.

55W SOX, in the form of the GEC Z9536 and the Thorn Beta Two dominates residential streets, to the point that 35W SOX couldn’t be found anywhere. It is a puzzle as to why Dublin (and many parts of Ireland and Northern Ireland for that matter) went for the 55W SOX when 35W SOX could run on the same control gear and collectively save a tonne of money!

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This square-based Pembroke column was found tucked away in Castlewood Place, Rathmines.

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A close-up of the column base. There is an identical column in Dublin’s Merrion Square Park, which doubles as a museum of old Dublin street lights.

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Also in Castlewood Place, if my memory serves me correctly, was this wall-mounted bracket with shamrock with a GEC Z5590.

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Sugarstick lamp posts with GEC Z5590s on Church Gardens, Rathmines. This style of lamp column first appeared in 1915.

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This second example of a sugar stick lamp post, in Rathmines Park, holds a green-painted GEC Z9539.

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Also in Rathmines Park was this with an Eleco GR 553 on an unidentified cast iron column.

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A close-up of the exquisite bracket.

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Double take! Is this a top entry or a side-entry Thorn Beta Two?

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A close-up photograph of one of the brackets on Old Mountpleasant reveals it is a standard Beta Two (which were never a top-entry lantern in the first place) and it’s the unusual bracket that gives the lantern an unusual appearance.


Last edited by David on Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:28 pm 
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My tenth post looks at the street lighting to the perimeter of Mountpleasant Square in Rathmines. All the photographs in this post were taken in April 2017.

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Around the corner from Old Mountpleasant is Mountpleasant Square. It has a selection of old cast iron columns with GEC Z5590s to its perimeter...

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...with the exception of this imposter.

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A close-up of the column base showing the columns’s manufacturer (REVO) and a modified version of the Lord Mayor of Dublin’s Coat-of-Arms, which can be seen on many of the city's lamp-posts.  

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Further along Mountpleasant Square is this sugarstick lamp post with a GEC Z5590s, as also seen in Church Gardens in an earlier post.

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A close-up of the sugarstick lamp post’s bracket.

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Unidentified columns similar to the REVO columns pictured earlier are installed on the south side of Mountpleasant Square.

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A close-up of the base of one of these columns, also bearing a modified version of the Lord Mayor of Dublin’s Coat-of-Arms.

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The west side of Mountpleasant Square also has these unidentified columns, although with more of the column base hidden.

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A close-up photograph of the scroll and shamrock-decorated bracket.


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